Launch Vehicles

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Modes of Transport

Bicycle – Bicycles were introduced in the 19th century in Europe. The first chain-driven model was developed around 1885.  They are used for transportation, bicycle commuting, and utility cycling.  It can be used by mail carriers, paramedics, police, messengers, and general delivery services.  Military uses of bicycles include communications, reconnaissance, troop movement, supply of provisions, and patrol.

Motorbike – The first internal combustion, petroleum fueled motorcycle was the Daimler Reitwagen.  It was designed and built by the German inventors Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach in Bad Cannstatt, Germany in 1885.  In 1894, Hildebrand & Wolfmüller became the first series production motorcycle.  Motorbike design varies greatly to suit a range of different purposes: long distance travel, commuting, cruising, sport including racing, and off-road riding.  Today, this area is dominated by mostly Indian companies with Hero MotoCorp emerging as the world’s largest manufacturer of two wheelers.

Car – The first working steam-powered vehicle was designed and built by Ferdinand Verbiest, a Flemish member of a Jesuit mission in China around 1672.  The large-scale production-line manufacturing of affordable cars was debuted by Ransom Olds in 1901 at his Oldsmobile factory located in Lansing, Michigan and based upon stationary assembly line techniques pioneered by Marc Isambard Brunel at the Portsmouth Block Mills, England, in 1802.  The assembly line style of mass production and interchangeable parts had been pioneered in the U.S. by Thomas Blanchard in 1821, at the Springfield Armory in Springfield, Massachusetts.  This concept was greatly expanded by Henry Ford, beginning in 1913 with the world’s first moving assembly line for cars at the Highland Park Ford Plant.

Jeep – Jeep is a brand of American automobiles that is a division of FCA US LLC (formerly Chrysler Group, LLC), a wholly owned subsidiary of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles.  Jeep’s current product range consists solely of sport utility vehicles and off-road vehicles, but has also included pickup trucks in the past.  The original Jeep was the prototype Bantam BRC. Willys MB Jeeps went into production in 1941 specifically for the military, arguably making them the oldest four-wheel drive mass-production vehicles now known as SUVs. They became the primary light 4-wheel-drive vehicle of the United States Army and the Allies during World War II, as well as the postwar period.  The term became common worldwide in the wake of the war.  The first civilian models were produced in 1945.  It inspired a number of other light utility vehicles, such as the Land Rover.  Many Jeep variants serving similar military and civilian roles have since been designed in other nations.  Jeeps have been built under licence by various manufacturers around the world, including Mahindra in India, EBRO in Spain, and several in South America.  Mitsubishi built more than 30 different Jeep models in Japan between 1953 and 1998.  Most of them were based on the CJ-3B model of the original Willys-Kaiser design.

Van – A van is a kind of vehicle used for transporting goods or people.  Depending on the type of van, it can be bigger or smaller than a truck and SUV, and bigger than an automobile.  There is some varying in the scope of the word across the different English-speaking countries.  The smallest vans, minivans, are commonly used for transporting people from a family.  Larger vans with passenger seats are used for institutional purposes, such as transporting students.  Larger vans with only front seats are often used for business purposes, to carry goods and equipment.  Specially-equipped vans are used by television stations as mobile studios.  Postal services and courier companies use large step vans to deliver packages.

Bus – Horse-drawn buses were used from the 1820s, followed by steam buses in the 1830s, and electric trolleybuses in 1882. The first internal combustion engine buses, or motor buses, were used in 1895. Recently, interest has been growing in hybrid electric buses, fuel cell buses, and electric buses, as well as ones powered by compressed natural gas or biodiesel. As of the 2010s, bus manufacturing is increasingly globalised, with the same designs appearing around the world.  Different types of buses include Steam Bus, Trolley Bus, and Motorbus.

The most common type of bus is the single-decker rigid bus, with larger loads carried by double-decker and articulated buses, and smaller loads carried by midibuses and minibuses. Coaches are used for longer-distance services.  Many types of buses, such as city transit buses and inter-city coaches, charge a fare. Other types, such as elementary or secondary school buses or shuttle buses within a post-secondary education campus do not charge a fare. Buses may be used for scheduled bus transport, scheduled coach transport, school transport, private hire, or tourism; promotional buses may be used for political campaigns and others are privately operated for a wide range of purposes, including rock and pop band tour vehicles.

Tram –  A tram (also known as tramcar; and in North America known as streetcar, trolley or trolley car) is a rail vehicle which runs on tracks along public urban streets, and also sometimes on a segregated right of way.  The very first tram was on the Swansea and Mumbles Railway in south Wales, UK; it was horse-drawn at first, and later moved by steam and electric power.  Tramways with tramcars or street railways with streetcars were common throughout the industrialized world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries but they had disappeared from most British, Canadian, French and US cities by the mid-20th century.  Since 1980 trams have returned to favor in many places, partly because their tendency to dominate the roadway, formerly seen as a disadvantage, is now considered to be a merit.  New systems have been built in the United States, Great Britain, Ireland, France, Australia and many other countries.

Train – A train is a form of rail transport consisting of a series of vehicles that usually runs along a rail track to transport cargo or passengers.  Motive power is provided by a separate locomotive or individual motors in self-propelled multiple units.  Although historically steam propulsion dominated, the most common modern forms are diesel and electric locomotives, the latter supplied by overhead wires or additional rails.  Other energy sources include horses, engine or water-driven rope or wire winch, gravity, pneumatics, batteries, and gas turbines.  Train tracks usually consist of two running rails, sometimes supplemented by additional rails such as electric conducting rails and rack rails, with a limited number of monorails and maglev guideways in the mix.

Airplane – An airplane or aeroplane (informally plane) is a powered, fixed-wing aircraft that is propelled forward by thrust from a jet engine or propeller.  Airplanes come in a variety of sizes, shapes, and wing configurations.  The broad spectrum of uses for airplanes includes recreation, transportation of goods and people, military, and research. Commercial aviation is a massive industry involving the flying of tens of thousands of passengers daily on airliners.  Most airplanes are flown by a pilot on board the aircraft, but some are designed to be remotely or computer-controlled.

Helicopter – A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors.  This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forward, backward, and laterally.  These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft and many forms of VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) aircraft cannot perform.

Rocket – A rocket (from Italian rocchetto “bobbin”) is a missile, spacecraft, aircraft or other vehicle that obtains thrust from a rocket engine.  Rocket engine exhaust is formed entirely from propellant carried within the rocket before use.  Rocket engines work by action and reaction and push rockets forward simply by expelling their exhaust in the opposite direction at high speed, and can therefore work in the vacuum of space.

Spacecraft – A spacecraft is a vehicle, or machine designed to fly in outer space. Spacecraft are used for a variety of purposes, including communications, earth observation, meteorology, navigation, space colonization, planetary exploration, and transportation of humans and cargo.  On a sub-orbital spaceflight, a spacecraft enters space and then returns to the surface, without having gone into an orbit.  For orbital spaceflights, spacecraft enter closed orbits around the Earth or around other celestial bodies.  Spacecraft used for human spaceflight carry people on board as crew or passengers from start or on orbit (space stations) only, whereas those used for robotic space missions operate either autonomously or telerobotically.  Robotic spacecraft used to support scientific research are space probes. Robotic spacecraft that remain in orbit around a planetary body are artificial satellites.  Only a handful of interstellar probes, such as Pioneer 10 and 11, Voyager 1 and 2, and New Horizons, are on trajectories that leave the Solar System.

Orbital spacecraft may be recoverable or not.  By method of reentry to Earth they may be divided in non-winged space capsules and winged spaceplanes.

Humanity has achieved space flight but only a few nations have the technology for orbital launches, including Russia (Roskosmos), the United States (NASA), the member states of the European Space Agency (ESA), Japan (JAXA), India (ISRO), and China (CNSA).

Ship – A ship is a large buoyant watercraft. Ships are generally distinguished from boats based on size, shape and cargo or passenger capacity. Ships are used on lakes, seas, rivers, and oceans for a variety of activities, such as the transport of people or goods, fishing, entertainment, public safety, and warfare. Historically, a ship was a sailing vessel with at least three square-rigged masts and a full bowsprit.

The first known vessels date back about 10,000 years ago, but could not be described as ships. The first navigators began to use animal skins or woven fabrics as sails.  Affixed to the top of a pole set upright in a boat, these sails gave early ships range.  This allowed men to explore widely, allowing for the settlement of Oceania for example (about 3,000 years ago).

Submarine – A submarine is a watercraft capable of independent operation underwater. It differs from a submersible, which has more limited underwater capability. The term most commonly refers to a large, crewed, autonomous vessel. It is also sometimes used historically or colloquially to refer to remotely operated vehicles and robots, as well as medium-sized or smaller vessels, such as the midget submarine and the wet sub.

Although experimental submarines had been built before, submarine design took off during the 19th century, and they were adopted by several navies. Submarines were first widely used during World War I (1914–1918), and now figure in many navies large and small. Military usage includes attacking enemy surface ships (merchant and military), submarines, aircraft carrier protection, blockade running, ballistic missile submarines as part of a nuclear strike force, reconnaissance, conventional land attack (for example using a cruise missile), and covert insertion of special forces. Civilian uses for submarines include marine science, salvage, exploration and facility inspection and maintenance. Submarines can also be modified to perform more specialized functions such as search-and-rescue missions or undersea cable repair. Submarines are also used in tourism, and for undersea archaeology.

Tank – A tank is an armoured fighting vehicle with tracks and a large tank gun that is designed for front-line combat. Modern tanks are mobile land weapon platforms, mounting a large-calibre cannon in a rotating gun turret. They combine this with heavy vehicle armour which provides protection for the crew, the vehicle’s weapons, and its propulsion systems, and operational mobility, due to its use of tracks rather than wheels, which allows the tank to move over rugged terrain and be positioned on the battlefield in advantageous locations.

Truck – A truck (United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico and Pakistan; also called a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and India) is a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo.  Trucks vary greatly in size, power, and configuration, with the smallest being mechanically similar to an automobile.  Commercial trucks can be very large and powerful, and may be configured to mount specialized equipment, such as in the case of fire trucks and concrete mixers and suction excavators.

Tractor – A tractor is an engineering vehicle specifically designed to deliver a high tractive effort (or torque) at slow speeds, for the purposes of hauling a trailer or machinery used in agriculture or construction.  Most commonly, the term is used to describe a farm vehicle that provides the power and traction to mechanize agricultural tasks, especially (and originally) tillage, but nowadays a great variety of tasks.  Agricultural implements may be towed behind or mounted on the tractor, and the tractor may also provide a source of power if the implement is mechanised.

Road Roller – A road roller (sometimes called a roller-compactor, or just roller) is a compactor type engineering vehicle used to compact soil, gravel, concrete, or asphalt in the construction of roads and foundations, similar rollers are used also at landfills or in agriculture.

Trailer Vehicle – A trailer is generally an unpowered vehicle towed by a powered vehicle.  It is commonly used for the transport of goods and materials.  Sometimes recreational vehicles, travel trailers, or mobile homes with limited living facilities, where people can camp or stay have been referred to as trailers.  In earlier days, many such vehicles were towable trailers.

 

Source: Wikipedia/Internet

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